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How do I Choose the Best Pea Sheller?

Sara Schmidt
By
Updated May 16, 2024
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When selecting a pea sheller, the use of the product should be kept in mind. Whether it will be used for large or small amounts of shelling, as well as how often it will be used, are important points to consider. The purchaser's budget should also be kept in mind while shopping for pea shellers.

Home cooks who require a pea sheller for general home food processing should not purchase a large commercial sheller. A smaller, manual sheller should work fine for everyday family use. For chefs who work in a commercial setting, however, a larger pea husker that can handle frequent, heavy volume use is typically recommended.

For various reasons, cooks may prefer an electric pea sheller to a hand operated one. Though an electric device may reduce the amount of work needed and make shelling easier, it will likely cost more than a manual model. Many small, manual shellers can also be motorized, if desired, by attaching them to an electric device, such as a blender. Portability, which is also afforded by smaller machines, may be another deciding factor for cooks who operate in small kitchens.

Costs vary considerably among different pea sheller models, depending on the need of the product. A commercial grade electric unit costs significantly more than a manual pea sheller. A hand crank model is typically cheapest, while a bushel commercial sheller is the most expensive. The frequency of serving or cooking peas within the home or restaurant should also be considered.

A good pea sheller should be able to shell a variety of peas, such as black eye, cream, and other types of peas. It should also be useful in shelling beans. If a pea sheller cannot shell difficult to shell beans, such as lima and butter varieties, it may not be worth purchasing. The sheller should operate well without causing extensive damage to the peas or beans. If the product does damage the food, it should be returned or exchanged, if possible.

The clamp of a pea sheller is also an important thing to keep in mind when selecting the best device. It should hold the appliance steady during operation. If the clamp fails to keep the appliance stationary, a different machine may be needed. The parts of a sheller, which may vary from plastic to steel to nylon, may also be a factor in deciding on the best sheller. Some chefs may have a personal preference, depending on experience and frequency of use.

DelightedCooking is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Sara Schmidt
By Sara Schmidt
With a Master's Degree in English from Southeast Missouri State University, Sara Schmidt puts her expertise to use by writing for DelightedCooking, plus various magazines, websites, and nonprofit organizations. She published her own novella and has other literary projects in the works. Sara's diverse background includes teaching children in Spain, tutoring college students, running CPR and first aid classes, and organizing student retreats, reflecting her passion for education and community engagement.
Discussion Comments
By Pippinwhite — On Mar 09, 2014

My mother had a pea sheller. It had a blade that split the hull, making it easier to shell the peas. You just stuck the pea pod through and pulled it out.

The drawback was the blade stuck out a little too far, and sometimes would split the peas, as well as the hull. So that's something to remember. The blade should stick out far enough to slice the hull, but not the peas inside.

They can make life a lot easier, but you definitely have to watch how deeply the blade is cutting into the hull.

Sara Schmidt
Sara Schmidt
With a Master's Degree in English from Southeast Missouri State University, Sara Schmidt puts her expertise to use by writing for DelightedCooking, plus various magazines, websites, and nonprofit organizations. She published her own novella and has other literary projects in the works. Sara's diverse background includes teaching children in Spain, tutoring college students, running CPR and first aid classes, and organizing student retreats, reflecting her passion for education and community engagement.
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