We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.

Advertiser Disclosure

Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.

How We Make Money

We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently from our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What is Lasagne?

Mary McMahon
By
Updated May 16, 2024
Our promise to you
DelightedCooking is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At DelightedCooking, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

Lasagna is both a type of noodle and a dish made with that noodle; when pluralized, lasagna noodles are known as “lasagne”. Lasagne are long, flat, broad noodles which are ideally suited to layering in a baking dish to make a sort of noodle pie with an assortment of ingredients which may include meats, cheeses, and tomato sauce. Most markets carry lasagna noodles, often in an assortment of flavors including spinach, whole wheat, and plain, and making the baked noodle dish which calls for these noodles is quite easy.

The history of the name of these noodles is actually quite interesting. “Lasagna” is derived from the Greek lasanon, which means “chamber pot.” The Romans borrowed the word to refer to cooking pots of a similar shape, and eventually the word came to be used to refer to the noodles which were traditionally layered in a lasanum, a Roman lasagna dish. Many people are unaware of the humble origins of the name for this popular Italian food, which means that you can trot it out at your next dinner party and look impressive.

In Italy, lasagne are totally flat, while American lasagne tend to be ruffled along the edges to help trap sauces. The best noodles are made from Durum wheat, a particularly hard wheat which stands up to extended cooking, remaining chewy and resilient even after boiling and baking. Some cooks prefer to use special no-boil lasagna noodles, which are layered into a lasagna pan without being precooked. The moisture in the lasagna and the heat of the oven cook these noodles so that they are finished along with the rest of the lasagna.

There are numerous lasagna recipes used throughout the world, since this Italian dish has caught on in many nations. All of these recipes involve alternating layers of lasagne with various sauces, cheeses, and other ingredients. A lasagna can contain spinach, eggplant, tomato sauce, meat, and cheeses like mozzarella, ricotta, and Parmesan. Many cooks develop their own lasagna specialties, and this dish often appears at potlucks and big family dinners since it is easy to make for a crowd.

A whole lasagna can also be assembled and then frozen without being cooked, allowing the cook to prepare the lasagna at his or her leisure. Frozen lasagna can be a useful tool in the culinary arsenal in a busy household, since a cook can assemble two lasagne, bake one, and freeze the other to prepare on a busy day. Lasagne are also frequently brought to post-operative patients and grieving families so that they can have nutritious home-cooked meals without the effort.

DelightedCooking is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Mary McMahon
By Mary McMahon

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a DelightedCooking researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

Discussion Comments

By anon174308 — On May 10, 2011

lasagna in its modern form as in made with pasta would not have been an italian dish until after the late 1200s as pasta in Italy did not exist. it is more likely that it remained during Roman times in its traditional Greek form, the work deriving from flat breads that the greeks would have used to compile a hearty meal.

By anon149110 — On Feb 03, 2011

I love, love, love, love, love lasagna. And to the author of this article, it is spelled lasagna not lasagne.

Mary McMahon

Mary McMahon

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a...

Learn more
DelightedCooking, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

DelightedCooking, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.