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Which Fruit Was the First Eaten on the Moon?

Astronauts had previously enjoyed applesauce while orbiting the earth, but peaches were the first fruit to be eaten on the moon. During the United States' Apollo 11 moon mission, the astronauts were able to enjoy two meals while on the moon. Along with canned peaches, the first meal included bacon squares, sugar cookie cubes, coffee and a beverage made with pineapple and grapefruit juices.

More facts about eating on the moon:

  • The second moon-side meal enjoyed during the Apollo 11 mission consisted of cream of chicken soup, beef stew, grape punch, an orange drink and date fruitcake.

  • Turkey is sometimes erroneously identified as the first meal on the moon. The astronauts on Apollo 8 were served turkey, dressing and cranberry sauce in space, but their 1968 flight did not include a moon landing.

  • Many of the foods included on early moon flights were freeze-dried, meaning that all moisture was removed from the foods, allowing them to be packed in lightweight, airtight packaging. The packaging helped preserve the taste and nutrition of the foods, allowing astronauts to enjoy balanced meals during missions.

Malcolm Tatum
By Malcolm Tatum
Malcolm Tatum, a former teleconferencing industry professional, followed his passion for trivia, research, and writing to become a full-time freelance writer. He has contributed articles to a variety of print and online publications, including DelightedCooking, and his work has also been featured in poetry collections, devotional anthologies, and newspapers. When not writing, Malcolm enjoys collecting vinyl records, following minor league baseball, and cycling.

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Malcolm Tatum
Malcolm Tatum
Malcolm Tatum, a former teleconferencing industry professional, followed his passion for trivia, research, and writing...
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