We are independent & ad-supported. We may earn a commission for purchases made through our links.
Advertiser Disclosure
Our website is an independent, advertising-supported platform. We provide our content free of charge to our readers, and to keep it that way, we rely on revenue generated through advertisements and affiliate partnerships. This means that when you click on certain links on our site and make a purchase, we may earn a commission. Learn more.
How We Make Money
We sustain our operations through affiliate commissions and advertising. If you click on an affiliate link and make a purchase, we may receive a commission from the merchant at no additional cost to you. We also display advertisements on our website, which help generate revenue to support our work and keep our content free for readers. Our editorial team operates independently of our advertising and affiliate partnerships to ensure that our content remains unbiased and focused on providing you with the best information and recommendations based on thorough research and honest evaluations. To remain transparent, we’ve provided a list of our current affiliate partners here.

What are Red Chile Peppers?

Jessica Ellis
By
Updated May 16, 2024
Our promise to you
DelightedCooking is dedicated to creating trustworthy, high-quality content that always prioritizes transparency, integrity, and inclusivity above all else. Our ensure that our content creation and review process includes rigorous fact-checking, evidence-based, and continual updates to ensure accuracy and reliability.

Our Promise to you

Founded in 2002, our company has been a trusted resource for readers seeking informative and engaging content. Our dedication to quality remains unwavering—and will never change. We follow a strict editorial policy, ensuring that our content is authored by highly qualified professionals and edited by subject matter experts. This guarantees that everything we publish is objective, accurate, and trustworthy.

Over the years, we've refined our approach to cover a wide range of topics, providing readers with reliable and practical advice to enhance their knowledge and skills. That's why millions of readers turn to us each year. Join us in celebrating the joy of learning, guided by standards you can trust.

Editorial Standards

At DelightedCooking, we are committed to creating content that you can trust. Our editorial process is designed to ensure that every piece of content we publish is accurate, reliable, and informative.

Our team of experienced writers and editors follows a strict set of guidelines to ensure the highest quality content. We conduct thorough research, fact-check all information, and rely on credible sources to back up our claims. Our content is reviewed by subject-matter experts to ensure accuracy and clarity.

We believe in transparency and maintain editorial independence from our advertisers. Our team does not receive direct compensation from advertisers, allowing us to create unbiased content that prioritizes your interests.

Red chile peppers are any of several varieties of Capsicum plants that have a red or crimson color. Most varieties of red peppers are used as a spice or for seasoning, although some, like the red bell pepper, is consumed as a vegetable. Most red chile peppers are known for their hot and spicy taste, the intensity of which varies between different species of chile.

The heat and bite of chile peppers is measured by the ingenious Scoville scale, devised by American chemist William Scoville. By diluting an extract of the peppers in sugar water until the heat is no longer detectable, Scoville determined a fairly accurate measurement of chili pepper’s relative heat. Red peppers are often misidentified as being always hotter than green or yellow varieties, but it is true that, according to the Scoville scale, the four hottest varieties of known chilies are all red.

The hottest red chile in the world is grown in Bangladesh, and called the naga jolokia. With a Scoville rating of over one million units, the naga jolokia is more than 20 times hotter than the comparatively mild and more common cayenne pepper. Following the naga jolokia is the red savina pepper, a specially bred cultivar of habenero that has been created to provide greater heat and spice. Traditional habeneros are also near the top of the scale, having a Scoville score of 350,000, nearly identical to another red chile called the Scotch bonnet.

Red chile peppers are easy to grow in warm climates and make wonderful additions to a vegetable or herb garden. Choose a planting area that receives plenty of sunshine and keep evenly moist, watering lightly a few times a week. Peppers grow well in planters and pots, but should be set about 12 inches (30 cm) apart from one another. If the plants grow to be more than 12 inches (30 cm) tall, they should be tied to supports to help balance weight. Most red peppers will be green at first, but darken to orange and red as they ripen.

Red chile peppers are often dried and sold as spices, either whole or ground. The heat of the spice will depend on the type of chilies used. Most dried chile powder sold in America is made from mildly spicy ancho chilies and moderately hot cayenne peppers. You may also see chile powder available in stores, which is usually a blend of jalapeño or ancho chilies with onion, garlic, and other spices.

Using red chile peppers is a great way to add intensity and heat to any dish. They are traditional spices in many Central and South American dishes, as well as in Asian and Indian cuisine. Learning what level of heat that you prefer can be an exciting taste adventure. Be wise when testing out varieties of red chiles; if one is too hot, ignore the temptation to drink water to wash it away. Instead, try eating a small piece of bread or a few chips to absorb the heat.

DelightedCooking is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Jessica Ellis
By Jessica Ellis
With a B.A. in theater from UCLA and a graduate degree in screenwriting from the American Film Institute, Jessica Ellis brings a unique perspective to her work as a writer for DelightedCooking. While passionate about drama and film, Jessica enjoys learning and writing about a wide range of topics, creating content that is both informative and engaging for readers.
Discussion Comments
By Logicfest — On Oct 08, 2014

@Melonlity -- Which hot pepper sauce is the best? That's easy. The stuff you make yourself is the best.

And that stuff is so, so easy to make. Simply grow your favorite type of hot pepper or combination of them, harvest your peppers, put them in a bottle, add white vinegar and then let that combination sit for about a year. If you want to infuse a bit more flavor, add some salt (sea salt is great, by the way) and a couple of cloves of garlic.

And don't worry about growing peppers. Those things are very hardy and quite easy to grow. Your best bet might be to get a young pepper bush at your favorite plant nursery and then grow that.

By Melonlity — On Oct 07, 2014

It is very true those are common in central and south American dishes, but hot peppers are also a staple here in the beautiful southern United States. A bottle of pepper sauce is typical at the dinner table and heavy discussions break out over which hot peppers are the best, which pepper sauce is the best, etc.

How common are hot peppers down here? For years, I thought that cayenne pepper was a common ingredient in biscuits and gravy.

Jessica Ellis
Jessica Ellis
With a B.A. in theater from UCLA and a graduate degree in screenwriting from the American Film Institute, Jessica Ellis...
Learn more
DelightedCooking, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.

DelightedCooking, in your inbox

Our latest articles, guides, and more, delivered daily.