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What is Cracked Wheat?

Mary McMahon
By
Updated May 16, 2024
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Cracked wheat is a wheat product made from whole raw wheat kernels which are crushed or cut into smaller pieces. There are a large number of uses for this food, and it makes a popular dietary supplement in many cultures. Many grocery stores carry cracked wheat, which should be stored in a cool dry place until use so that it does not go rancid. If not used within one year, the wheat should be discarded.

A similar product, bulgur wheat, is also made by cracking wheat kernels. Bulgur, however, is made from wheat kernels which are steamed and toasted before cracking, so that they develop a rich, nutty flavor. Bulgur also requires minimal cooking, since it is already partially cooked. Cracked wheat, on the other hand, uses whole raw wheat berries. Numerous other types of cracked grain are also available for use in various recipes and animal fodder.

Because cracked wheat is made from whole wheat berries, it carries a great deal of nutrition and fiber since it includes the fiber and nutrient rich outer bran and germ of the wheat. For this reason, it is often added to healthy diets, especially those eaten by people who are concerned about heart health. Other whole cracked grains may be used as well, for variation in flavor and nutrition.

There are a wide range of uses for cracked wheat. Many people use it as a base, like couscous, serving vegetables or meats alongside it. It can also be used in grain pilafs, and many recipes for multi-grain pilaf call for cracked wheat, since it is fluffy and flavorful. Many people also include it in multi-grain bread, pancakes, and other grain dishes. The crushed wheat berries may be soaked or partially cooked when they are included in recipes such as bread, to ensure that they are fully cooked when the food is served.

As with all grains, cracked wheat should be washed before use, to remove residual dirt and other compounds which may have adhered to the wheat during growing, processing, and shipping. The easiest way to do this is to measure the wheat out into a fine grained colander, running water over it and gently stirring it with a spatula or by hand to make sure that each grain is washed. Soaking the washed wheat will also make it cook more quickly. Some people like to put grains on to soak when they leave the house in the morning, so that they will cook quickly at dinnertime. Cooked wheat can be stored in a snug container under refrigeration for several days for use in salads, pancakes, and other foods.

DelightedCooking is dedicated to providing accurate and trustworthy information. We carefully select reputable sources and employ a rigorous fact-checking process to maintain the highest standards. To learn more about our commitment to accuracy, read our editorial process.
Mary McMahon
By Mary McMahon

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a DelightedCooking researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

Discussion Comments

By anon144802 — On Jan 20, 2011

If you don't have any, what would you use instead?

By anon127344 — On Nov 16, 2010

I cook cracked wheat or bulgur wheat for breakfast. Put canned fruit, frozen blueberries, pecans or walnuts on it and you have a delicious healthy cereal. Cook one cup to two cups of water, adding salt to taste. Recently, I have used it to make a cracked wheat bread in my bread maker. It makes a wonderful bread that is moist and soft.

By anon122480 — On Oct 28, 2010

I use cracked wheat in homemade English Muffins. It gives the critical crunch to the muffin.

By cmsmith10 — On Jul 04, 2010

I buy cracked wheat at the health food store. I add it to muffins and bread to give it a nutty flavor. The smaller the size of the cracked wheat, the faster it will cook.

By anon67613 — On Feb 25, 2010

I have a recipe for russian black bread that calls for "bran flakes", but says clearly that they do not mean "bran cereal." They also say it is available in health food stores. Do you think they mean wheat bran?

Mary McMahon

Mary McMahon

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a...

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