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What is Masala?

Sara Schmidt
By
Updated May 16, 2024
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Aficionados of Southeast Asian cuisine may be familiar with the mixture of spices known as masala. A blend of fragrant Indian spices in dry or paste form, it is used to flavor many traditional foods and beverages throughout the region. Several different variations of the mixture exist, each with its own unique spice blend and specific use.

Several types of these herbal blends are used in Indian cuisine. For pungent spice lovers, garam masala may be a favorite flavoring. This blend often features peppercorns, nutmeg, cumin, star anise, cardamom, cloves, and coriander. This vividly intense seasoning is used in conjunction with other spices or alone in dishes such as chicken curry.

A fragrant, flavorful hot tea, masala chai is made by blending a selection of spices with loose leaf tea. Like curry, no set recipe exists for the spice blend itself, though milk, sweetener, and warm spices are commonly used. Each cup will vary, though some standard ingredients may include ginger, cloves, black pepper, cardamom, star anise, salt, almonds, nutmeg, licorice, cinnamon, or rose petals. The herbs are usually added during the brewing process.

For a sweeter taste, chaat masala can be enjoyed on its own or with traditional Indian fast food dishes, such as golgappa, Dahi puri, bhelpuri, and aaloo chaat. The mixture can also be served in drinks or sprinkled on salads and fruits. Some common ingredients in this sweet and sour variation include dried mango powder, chili powder, asafoetida, and ginger.

Clay oven cooking styles often make use of tandoori masala. Often used in chicken and fish dishes, this mixture often contains garlic, lemon juice, cayenne pepper, and other traditional ingredients. This Northern Indian blend is also used in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Curry, often in the form of a yogurt-based gravy, is made with a masala mixture of coriander, ginger, turmeric, cumin, cloves, and many other seasonings. Onions, garlic, and other ingredients may also be included. It is often used to flavor side dishes made with tofu, chicken, or vegetables served with rice. Chicken tikka masala, another curry meal, is made with a creamy tomato-based orange sauce.

The Hindi word for spice mixture, masala can be found on the menus of many restaurants, both in the Eastern world as well as the West. While most Indian restaurants will carry dishes by this name, many non-Indian venues may also carry a signature dish of this type. These spicy blends can also be used to flavor dishes when cooking at home. While prepared mixtures and pastes are available from some supermarkets and cooking supply stores, many chefs prefer to make their own freshly-ground blends. Some even roast their herbal mixtures for a richer taste.

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Sara Schmidt
By Sara Schmidt , Writer
With a Master's Degree in English from Southeast Missouri State University, Sara Schmidt puts her expertise to use by writing for DelightedCooking, plus various magazines, websites, and nonprofit organizations. She published her own novella and has other literary projects in the works. Sara's diverse background includes teaching children in Spain, tutoring college students, running CPR and first aid classes, and organizing student retreats, reflecting her passion for education and community engagement.

Discussion Comments

By anon953663 — On May 28, 2014

If you like spicy and healthy, try the chana masala. My guys from India and Sri Lanka made it for me while I was in Iraq. I can't do it without bread and butter, though. If it's made right, it'll clear your sinuses.

By anon168521 — On Apr 17, 2011

masala is used to cook indian curry like potatoes, chicken, beef and what vegetables you want to curry.

Sara Schmidt

Sara Schmidt

Writer

With a Master's Degree in English from Southeast Missouri State University, Sara Schmidt puts her expertise to use by writing for DelightedCooking, plus various magazines, websites, and nonprofit organizations. She published her own novella and has other literary projects in the works. Sara's diverse background includes teaching children in Spain, tutoring college students, running CPR and first aid classes, and organizing student retreats, reflecting her passion for education and community engagement.
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